Announcing selected contributions!

Select your language below to view the announcement:
English | Spanish


Selected Contributions

In response to our call for contributions and reflections on «Decolonising the Internet’s Languages» in August, we are delighted to announce that we received 50 submissions, in over 38 languages! We are so overwhelmed and grateful for the interest and support of our many communities around the world; it demonstrates how critical this effort is for all of us. From all these extraordinary offerings, we have selected nine that we will invite and support the contributors to expand further.

Thank you to all of you who wrote in: we would publish every one of your contributions if we could! Each of you highlighted unique aspects of the problem and possibility of the multilingual internet, and it was extremely difficult to select a few to include in the ‘State of the Internet’s Languages Report’. Whether your submission was selected or not, we hope you will continue to be part of this work with us, and that the report will reflect your thoughtful concerns and interests in a multi-lingual internet.

The nine selected contributions will be a significant aspect of the openly licensed State of the Internet’s Languages report to be published mid-2020. In different formats and languages, they span many kinds of language contexts across the world, from many different communities and perspectives. They will form part of a broader narrative combining data and experience, highlighting how limited the current language capacities of the internet are, and how much opportunity there is for making our knowledges available in our many languages.

A special thank you to the final contributors – we’ll be in touch shortly with more details. We’re looking forward to working with you as you develop your contributions and share your experiences!

The selected contributions are from:

  • Caddie Brain, Joel Liddle, Leigh Harris, Graham Wilfred

As part of a broader movement to increase inclusion and diversity in emojis, Aboriginal people in Central Australia are creating Indigemoji, the first set of Australian Indigenous emojis delivered via a free app. Caddie, Joel, Leigh and Graham aim to describe how to reflect Aboriginal experiences online, to increase the accessibility of Arrernte language in the broader Australian lexicon, to position Arrernte knowledge on digital platforms for future generations of Arrentre speakers and learners, and to contribute more broadly to the decolonisation of the internet.

  • Claudia Soria

Claudia will describe “The Digital Language Diversity Project” funded by the European Commission under the Erasmus+ programme. The project has surveyed the digital use and usability of four European minority languages: Basque, Breton, Karelian and Sardinian. It has also developed a number of instruments that can help speakers’ communities drive the digital life of their languages, in the form of a methodology named “digital language planning”.

  • Donald Flywell Malanga

Donald will share his experiences conducting two panel discussions with elderly and ten young Ndali People in Chisitu Village based in Misuku Hills, Malawi. He aims to hear their stories and make sense of them relating to how Chindali could be spoken/expressed online, examine the barriers they face in sharing/expressing their language online, and unearth possible solutions to address such barriers.

  • Emna Mizouni

Emna will interview African and Arab content creators and consumers to share their experiences in posting content in their own language and expose their cultures. She will reach out to different ethnicities from Africa to gather data on the reasons they use the “colonial languages” on the internet and the burdens they face, whether technical such as internet connectivity and accessibility, lack of devices, social or cultural barriers, etc.

  • Ishan Chakraborty

Ishan will explore the experiences of individuals who identify themselves as both disabled and queer, and who are not visible online in Bengali. Online research papers and academic works in Bengali are significantly limited, and even more so in the case of works on marginalities and intersections. One of the most effective ways of making online material accessible to persons with visual disability is through audio material, and Ishan will explore some of these possibilities.

  • Joaquín Yescas Martínez

Joaquin will be describing the free software, open technology initiatives and the sharing philosophy of “compartencia” in his community of Mixe and Zapotec peoples in Mexico. He will explore initiatives such as Xhidza Penguin School, an app to learn the language online, and learning workshops to look at new methodologies for sharing and using the language. It is not only a means of communication but it also encompasses a different way of understanding the world.

  • Kelly Foster

Kelly will draw attention to the work being done to revitalise indigenous languages and the struggles to represent the Nation Languages of the Caribbean and its diasporas in structured data and on Wikipedia. She aims to have the native names of the islands, locations and indigenous peoples on Wikidata, labelled with their own language so she can generate a map of the Caribbean with as many native names as possible. But the language of the Taino people of the islands that are now called Jamaican, Cuba, Puerto Rico and Haiti has been labelled as extinct, as are the people, by European researchers. Though a victim of the first European genocide of the Caribbean, they live on in the tongues and blood of people who are more often racialised as Black and Latinx.

  • Paska Darmawan

As a first-generation college student who did not understand English, Paska had difficulties in finding educational, inspiring content about LGBTQIA issues in their native language, let alone positive content about the local LGBTQIA community. They plan to share a mapping of available Indonesian digital LGBTQIA content, whether it be in the form of Wikipedia articles, websites, social media accounts, or any other online media.

  • Uda Deshpriya

Uda will explore the lack of feminist content on the internet in Sinhala and Tamil. Mainstream human rights discussions take place in English and leaves out the majority of Sri Lankans. Women’s rights discourse remains even more centralized. Despite the fact that all primary criminal and civil courts work in local languages, statutes and decided cases are not available in Sinhala and Tamil, including Sri Lanka’s Constitution and its amendments. This extends to content creation through both text and art, with significant barriers of keyboard and input methods.

Back to top


Propuestas Seleccionadas

En respuesta a nuestra convocatoria de contribuciones y reflexiones sobre «Descolonizar los Idiomas en Internet» lanzada el pasado Agosto, nos complace anunciar que recibimos ¡50 postulaciones en más de 38 idiomas!. Estamos abrumadas pero profundamente agradecidas por el interés y el apoyo de nuestras muchas comunidades en todo el mundo; que a través de este proceso nos han demuestrado cuán crítico es este esfuerzo para todos y todas. Hemos seleccionado nueve de estas extraordinarias postulaciones, y posteriormente apoyaremos a los y las autoras para expandir aún más su propuesta.

Gracias a todas las personas que aplicaron: ¡publicaríamos cada una de sus contribuciones si nos fuera posible! Cada una de ustedes destacó aspectos únicos del problema y de la posibilidad de una Internet multilingüe, y fue extremadamente difícil seleccionar solo un puñado de trabajos para incluir en el «Informe sobre el Estado de los Idiomas de Internet». Ya sea que tu propuesta haya sido seleccionado o no, esperamos que continues siendo parte de este trabajo con nosotras, y que el informe refleje tus inquietudes y reflexiones en relación a una Internet multilingüe.

Las nueve contribuciones seleccionadas serán un elemento significativo dentro del informe del Estado de los Idiomas de Internet que se publicará con una licencia abierta a mediados de 2020. Las contribuciones seleccionadas abarcan muchos contextos lingüísticos en todo el mundo, reflejan las perspectivas de diferentes comunidades, y serán realizadas en diferentes formatos e idiomas. Estos trabajos serán parte integral de una narrativa más amplia que combina datos y experiencia, destacando cuán limitadas son las capacidades lingüísticas actuales en Internet y qué oportunidades hay para que nuestros conocimientos estén disponibles en nuestros muchos idiomas.

Un agradecimiento especial a los y las colaboradoras finales: en breve nos pondremos en contacto con más detalles. ¡Esperamos trabajar con ustedes mientras desarrollan sus contribuciones y comparten sus experiencias!

Las contribuciones seleccionadas son:

  • Caddie Brain, Joel Liddle, Leigh Harris, Graham Wilfred

Como parte de un movimiento más amplio para aumentar la inclusión y la diversidad de los emojis, las personas Aborígenes en Australia Central están creando Indigemoji, el primer conjunto de emojis indígenas australianos disponibles a través de una aplicación gratuita. Caddie, Joel, Leigh y Graham tienen como objetivo describir cómo reflejar las experiencias Aborígenes en línea, aumentar la accesibilidad del idioma Arrernte en el léxico australiano, posicionar el conocimiento de Arrernte en plataformas digitales para las futuras generaciones de hablantes y aprendices de Arrentre, y en general contribuir a la descolonización de internet.

  • Claudia Soria

Claudia describirá «El Proyecto de Diversidad de Lenguaje Digital» financiado por la Comisión Europea bajo el programa Erasmus +. El proyecto ha observado el uso digital y usabilidad de cuatro idiomas minoritarios europeos: Euskera, Bretón, Carelio y Sardo. También ha desarrollado una serie de instrumentos que pueden ayudar a las comunidades de hablantes a impulsar la vida digital de sus idiomas, en forma de una metodología llamada «planificación del lenguaje digital».

  • Donald Flywell Malanga

Donald compartirá sus experiencias conduciendo dos paneles de discusión con ancianos y diez jóvenes Ndali en la aldea Chisitu con sede en Misuku Hills, Malawi. Su objetivo es escuchar sus historias y darles sentido en relación a cómo el Chindali se podría expresar y hablar en línea, analizar las barreras que enfrentan al compartir y expresar su idioma en línea, y descubrir posibles soluciones para abordar esas barreras.

  • Emna Mizouni

Emna entrevistará a creadores/as y consumidores/as de contenido africanos y árabes para compartir sus experiencias sobre publicar contenido en su propio idioma y dar a conocer sus culturas. Se contactará con diferentes etnias de África para recopilar datos sobre las razones por las que usan «idiomas coloniales» en Internet y los obstáculos que enfrentan, ya sean técnicos: como la conectividad y accesibilidad a Internet, o la falta de dispositivos; o referido a barreras sociales o culturales, etc.

  • Ishan Chakraborty

Ishan explorará las experiencias de personas que se identifican como discapacitadas y queer, y que no son visibles en línea en Bengalí. Los trabajos de investigación en línea y trabajos académicos en Bengalí son significativamente limitados, y aún más cuando se tratan de marginalidades e intersecciones. Una de las formas más efectivas de lograr que el material en línea sea accesible para personas con discapacidad visual es a través de material de audio, e Ishan explorará algunas de estas posibilidades.

  • Joaquín Yescas Martínez

Joaquín describirá iniciativas de tecnología abierta y software libre, en combinación con la filosofía de «compartencia» en su comunidad de pueblos Mixe y Zapoteco en México. Explorará iniciativas como la Escuela del Pingüino Xhidza, la App Xhida (una aplicación para aprender el idioma en línea), y talleres de aprendizaje para analizar nuevas metodologías para compartir y usar el idioma originario. La iniciativa no se enfoca solo un medio de comunicación, sino que también abarca una forma diferente de entender el mundo.

  • Kelly Foster

Kelly destacará el trabajo que se está haciendo para revitalizar las lenguas indígenas y las luchas para representar las Lenguas Nacionales del Caribe y sus diásporas en datos estructurados y en Wikipedia. Su objetivo es contar con los nombres nativos de las islas, sus ubicaciones y el nombre de los pueblos indígenas en Wikidata, etiquetados con su propio idioma, para que se pueda generar un mapa del Caribe con tantos nombres nativos como sea posible. Investigadores europeos han calificado como extinto el lenguaje del pueblo Taíno de las islas que ahora se llaman Jamaica, Cuba, Puerto Rico y Haití, al igual que el pueblo mismo. Víctimas del primer genocidio europeo en el Caribe, el publo Taíno vive en la lengua y la sangre de personas que a menudo son racializadas como negras y latinas.

  • Paska Darmawan

Como parte de una primera generación que asistía a la universidad y que no entendía inglés, Paska tuvo dificultades para encontrar contenido educativo e inspirador sobre temas LGBTQIA en su idioma nativo, y todavía más para acceder a contenidos positivos sobre la comunidad LGBTQIA local. Paska compartirá un mapeo de contenido digital indonesio disponible sobre temas LGBTQIA, ya sea en forma de artículos de Wikipedia, sitios web, cuentas de redes sociales o cualquier otro medio en línea.

  • Uda Deshpriya

Uda explorará la falta de contenido feminista en Internet en Singalés y Tamil. Las principales discusiones sobre derechos humanos tienen lugar en inglés y excluyen a la mayoría de los y las habitantes de Sri Lanka. El discurso sobre los derechos de las mujeres está todavía más centralizado. A pesar de que todos los tribunales penales y civiles trabajan en idiomas locales, los estatutos y los casos resueltos no están disponibles en Singalés y Tamil, incluida la Constitución de Sri Lanka y sus enmiendas. Este panorama se extiende a la creación de contenidos tanto de texto como de expresiones artísticas, con presencia de barreras significativas de teclado y métodos de entrada.

Back to top