We are a global campaign to center the knowledge of marginalized communities (the majority of the world) on the internet.

Image by FloNight, CC BY-SA 3.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Grace Banu

#VisibleWikiWomen

Wikipedia is still missing so many images of notable women. Let’s add their faces to Wikimedia projects so that those who have been invisible can be fully seen this March!

Grace Banu, image by P.ABHIJITH, CC BY-SA 4.0 via Wikimedia Commons

Poscard design of Algerian poet Rabia Djelti

#VisibleWikiWomen: postcards of power and diversity

During the #VisibleWikiWomen challenge, the Wikimedia community and collaborators of the feminist movement focused on making more visible those women relevant to history and our time, who often go unnoticed. The contributions of images exceeded our expectations, and more than 800 new files were uploaded to Wikimedia Commons! The great quality of some of these images, as well as the stories of these women, led us to think: how can we use this valuable common visual heritage in inspiring ways?

Algerian poet Rabia Djelti, image by Kritzolina, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

what is ubuntu

Meet the Artist Who’s Hacking at Visibility and Knowledge With Art

Images help us make sense of the world. They are a unique form of knowledge with the potential to show us how to celebrate our differences in a way that language cannot. This is one of the reasons that the online visibility of humans, in all of our multiple and diverse forms, matters so deeply. Artist Gretchen Andrew encourages us to think about art as capable of dramatically changing the way the internet represents women and other marginalized communities.

What is ubuntu by artist Gretchen Andrew